Tuesday, March 31, 2020

1957: The lost ET Contact of Nathan S. Newman


Lee Van Cleef standing in for Natan S. Newman in Roger Corman’s 1956 classic, It Conquered the World

Several self-declared Contactees emerged during the 1950s. Some achieved a degree of recognition within the saucer community and a few even became national news, but how many others failed to take off? Consider the brief story of  of Los Angeles, California.

First, it should be noted that we don't actually know the method of contact Nathan achieved, whether it was facilitated by mechanical or psychic means.

It begins with an advertisement appearing in the March 18, 1957, issue of the Los Angeles Times. Newman calls on journalists interested in his extraterrestrial contacts.

Los Angeles Times, March 18, 1957
In a second ad, from April 9th, Newman was looking for funding in support of his contact operation.

Los Angeles Times, April 9, 1957

A third and final ad shows with more conventional concerns appeared on April 11.
We can only speculate, but something must have gone wrong.


Los Angeles Times, April 11, 1957

Did he find a sponsor, but a dispute arose over the funding?
Did he find an alien, but found the need to press charges?

We may never know.

And thus ends Contactee Nathan S. Newman's quest to bring understanding between humanity and an extraterrestrial civilization.

As with so many of the most interesting UFO cases featured here at The Saucers That Time Forgot, Project Blue Book has no file on this incident.

3 comments:

  1. Are you sure that isn't Lee Van Cleef with hair?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Check the caption:
      "Lee Van Cleef standing in for Natan S. Newman in Roger Corman’s 1956 classic, It Conquered the World"

      Delete
    2. That is unfortunately all the information that the diligent staff of STTF was able to find on Nathan S. Newman. No pictures, no before and after. Just a brief public call to bring about human-ET communication forward.

      Delete

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